The Barraca de Curucull

Quite by chance, I discovered a rather appealing Barraca de Curucull the other day, a dry-stone built shepherd’s hut, somewhere near S’Amarador and Santanyí.

Some of these old huts go back as far as the 14th century. They were used as a shelter for forest workers, charcoal burners, limestone workers, seaweed collectors, wood collectors, quarrymen, woodsmen, fishermen, coastguards, snow workers and sometimes, livestock. This Curucull was in a perfect state of conservation and could be entered into to admire the domed construction from below and close-up. Its conical roof assembly is of the same design as we find in the old wood-fired bread ovens, here on the island. This one also had walled outside coral areas, also extremely well-preserved.

In case you should be interested in the topic, the Consell de Mallorca does a website on the subject of Dry Stone Work and Hiking, giving explanations in English, drawings and photos on the huts’ construction and usage.

The photo (top) was taken near Santanyí, Mallorca, Baleares, Spain. The date: March 14th, 2012. The time was 17:24:37. The photo (bottom) was borrowed from the Internet, courtesy of conselldemallorca.net.

Moltes gràcies.

The Barraca de Curucull

One thought on “The Barraca de Curucull

  1. David says:

    How very interesting. They somehow remind me of the long-abandoned Highland bothies which are still maintained so that hikers can find a place to rest and sleep whilst walking in the splendid Scottish wilderness. The bothies are unlocked and travellers make sure that they leave wood for burning and perhaps even some canned goods for the next sojourners. Barraca de Curucull seem to provide a similar service.

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